My 1950s menu ( with additions)

21 Jan 2009






So here is my 1950s menu plan, Tasmanian style and with a summery theme too I guess.


SATURDAY
Breakfast:
stewed greengages ( plums)
weetbix
toast and butter and apricot jam ( or whatever you please)
orange juice
coffee or tea

Lunch:

scrambled eggs on wholemeal toast
lettuce and tomato
nectarines
biscuits and tea or coffee

Dinner:

vegetable lamb shank soup with a bread stick and butter ( I had a lamb bone in the freezer from last week's roast)
rice pudding


SUNDAY
Breakfast:

Orange juice
poached eggs on toast
packet cold cereal
coffee or tea

Lunch:

cheese salad sandwiches
nectarines and apricots
tea or coffee

Dinner:

it was to have been roast but we went for a late swim so we had Barbecued sausages
with salad and bread
vanilla ice cream and topping
tea or coffee

MONDAY
Breakfast:

orange juice
Cold packet cereal and milk and fruit
toast and butter and whatever you please, jam, promite, peanut butter,honey
tea or coffee

Lunch:

grilled cheese on toast
fruit
chocolate biscuits
tea or coffee ( and of course we usually have a glass or two of water)

Dinner:

roast beef with boiled and buttered new potatoes,boiled green peas ( frozen but good) and carrots.
no one was very hungry but we had left over rice pudding and the last of the nectarines
tea or coffee

TUESDAY
Breakfast:

banana choc chip muffins
Cold cereal for those who are extra hungry
pineapple juice
tea and coffee

Lunch:

baked beans on toast
bananas
tea or coffee

Dinner:

The rest of the sausages ( enough of the sausages already)
garden salad with the dressing in a separate jug
boiled potatoes with parsley butter
Atomic blue whip ( jelly whip made with blue jelly (jello) , some cold carnation milk plus some cream, all whipped together for about 4 minutes and then popped in the fridge)




carnation milk booklet and creation




WEDNESDAY
Breakfast:
weetbix and warm milk with grapes
toast , butter and whatever you want
pineapple juice
tea or coffee

Lunch:
Macaroni and cheese
apricots
tea or coffee

Dinner:
pork or lamb chops ( I'll decide when I get to the butcher)
mashed potato, broccoli, peas
fruit salad and cream
tea and coffee.

THURSDAY
Breakfast:
pikelets , butter and golden syrup
pineapple juice
tea or coffee.

Lunch:
egg salad sandwiches
apricots
anzac biscuits
tea or coffee

Dinner:
spaghetti with meatballs
bread and butter ( no garlic EVER in my mother's house, that delight awaited me when I left home)
green salad
lemon delicious pudding
tea or coffee







FRIDAY
Breakfast:
Orange juice
poached eggs on toast
cold cereal for the hungry
tea or coffee

Lunch:
potato and leek soup
cheese jaffle ( toasted cheese sandwich)
apricots and grapes
tea and coffee

Dinner:
shallow fried, flour dredged fish fillets with a green salad and boiled potatoes and peas.
bread and butter
butterscotch pudding and cream
tea and coffee


Plus I have made a chocolate cake and some anzac biscuits and choc chip biscuits (to finish off the packet before certain people sneak into the pantry and eat them all)








My menu does differ from the original in that I have used more eggs because I don't have to buy them. Also as my children are older they don't particularly always want a glass of milk with their meals ( although we all do sometimes)
The orange juice is from the greengrocer and the pineapple juice is from a can.

I haven't included morning and afternoon tea but that is usually a biscuit or two or a piece of cake or maybe just fruit and a hot or cold drink.

I have also been making packed lunches for Stephen and Louis this week. Generally they have a salad sandwich or roll and a piece of cake or a biscuit and some fruit.



So, What do you think?
The food seems rather plain but good fresh ingredients cooked well don't need much tarting up do they? My mother would never have made muffins but I had bananas that needed using and hungry people at the breakfast table. also my mother didn't buy orange juice, we rarely had it but when we did it was freshly squeezed. There is a particular brand of juice that Stephen and the children love so that is what we had.

I'd love to hear what you have to say.

EDIT: I must admit that the menu above is quite similar to our normal menu with the addition of things like tacos, homemade pizzas,the occasional curry and various pasta dishes. In winter time of course there are more stews. Someone asked about having fruit as part of a meal in cooler weather and I would say we mostly have it in the form of pies, crumbles, stewed with custard and so on.Also preserved or stewed fruit is yummy on hot or cold cereal. Good apples and pears are delicious with a nice cheddar cheese.

Many of you agree that the 1950s menu is the basis of your home cooking, that is cooking like your mothers and grandmothers with a few additions. Traditional recipes, handed down and enjoyed by a new generation is what good home cooking is all about regardless of what country you live in. Never forget, as long as you came from a home where food was cooked and enjoyed you do have family food traditions worth preserving.


22 Responses to “My 1950s menu ( with additions)”

  1. Better you than me! This is the
    sort of food I grew up on and
    I've never cooked it since!

    ReplyDelete
  2. I agree about the muffins, bananas are tricky. My Mum used them in custard with 100s and 1000s and also cut into homemade fruit salad made from two fruits in a can, passionfruit perhaps. I forget, but that was the 60s. Maybe crushed pineapple?

    ReplyDelete
  3. I was a 70's child, but your menu doesn't look terribly different to what would've been normal in our home for dinners.

    It's interesting to remember my childhood meals and observe the changes I have made in my own home. More adventurous meals and no dessert, except when we have visitors.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Not to sound too ignorant....but what are greengages?

    ReplyDelete
  5. Very similar to the food we had when I was a kid. My mother would have made banana cake or banana bread, and my aunt would have made banana fritters (Yum)
    take care
    Pip

    ReplyDelete
  6. Sounds great! Actually, we eat like that most nights. We are on such a tight budget at the moment that I have had to devise ways to eat well and cut corners. Like you I bake a cake and biscuits for morning/afternoon tea. I have made up a premixed cake/muffin mix that I keep in a huge tub and all I need to do is spoon out 3 cups of it, add water and one egg and away I go. Then I add whatever flavour- (cocoa, banana, orange juice and poppy seed, etc)

    I also try to keep the staple ingredients similar for every meal- (stock, tomato paste, seasonings, etc) so I am not always having to spend more on the small things. I find most weeks all I buy is fresh vegetables and milk.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Like Tracy, I'm a 70's kid too, but its all very familiar to me too :-)
    Pink Flummery (just like your blue whip) was always a favourite in our house. I tend to think that we'd all be alot healthier if we went back to basics like these recipes.
    Well, I'm off to make a pink Flummery. Yum!!! (might even share it with my kids lol)
    Cheers,
    Kathy

    ReplyDelete
  8. I think this is a wonderful idea, and no, the food doesnt sound bland at all. In fact, my partner would *love* everything on your "lists" so far! I'm always telling him he's an "old-fashioned eater". :)
    Perhaps I should follow your lead? Ha ha.
    Best of Luck!
    ~S.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love your illustrations. They are so cheerful and happy.
    Melinda

    ReplyDelete
  10. Oh now I feel old after reading all the comments...this is pretty much how we eat at our house now and very similar to how I ate as a child. We don't have dessert oftrn but there is always fruit, yogurt and cereal to fill up on if anyone is still hungry.
    I've never made the blue jelly thing but it looks good so I think I'll put the milk in the fridge to cool and make one for tomorrow.

    cheers Kate

    ReplyDelete
  11. This is all very much what I was brought up on, but my gran made these sort of recipes all the time. Julie.C

    ReplyDelete
  12. Looks good! In fact, a lot of things on your list are still common food for a lot of people here in Holland. We eat like this a few days a week on average.

    Christine

    ReplyDelete
  13. The menu is very good but the pictures are amazing. Very well choosen.

    Alfazema

    ReplyDelete
  14. Good evening Jenny
    I wish you would come and cook at my place, the breakfasts sound yummy, especially the pikelets & golden syrup.
    The menu does remind me of my Mum's cooking, and some of the items on your menu are meals we have. Eg. crumbed lamb cutlets with steamed vegies & spaghetti bolognese. Although my family are not into desserts, which is good as I have a sweet tooth.
    Also something I noticed in the menu was a lack of sauces, marinades and added artifical flavours...less preservatives, which has to be a good thing.

    ReplyDelete
  15. The menu doesn't seem stange to me at all. I am in the middle of raising a large family and I cook every night. These meals are simple and nourishing - true comfort food.

    ReplyDelete
  16. I think it sounds great. I think your family are fortunate to score dessert too and homebaked goodies. Homemade muffins for breakfast, what a treat.

    ReplyDelete
  17. We don't make a set menu for breakfast and lunch. I usually make a double dinner so we eat the leftovers for lunch. We also have gluten free dieters in the house who don't always want bread so they get a few more options. We homeschool, so my husband is the only one who takes a lunch to work, where he has a full kitchen to cook in if he needs to. I love the idea of more fruit in the meals in the summer months, but do you have a suggestion for the cold times?

    Just wanted to let you know that I have been reading your blog now for almost a year and find that the content now is just as good as your earlier stuff. This is also the first time I've commented. Thank you for writting, and sharing your sweet pleasant life with us. And never really complaining about your situation. Your quiet ways that come out in your writting have been a blessing.
    Thank you. Wendy from Texas

    ReplyDelete
  18. Believe it or not but it's very similar to how we eat. We probably have a few more condiments/spices/herbs and cereal bars rather than desserts, etc but generally it's the same kind of thing. Good wholesome yumminess! :)

    ReplyDelete
  19. Carrie I think greengages are plums. My parents house had lots of plum trees that my Great Grandmother planted.

    ReplyDelete
  20. Yes, Jenny says they are plums. I didn't see that added in.

    ReplyDelete
  21. OK! I concede! Everybody but
    me likes this food!

    ReplyDelete
  22. Hello Jenny,

    As another child of the '70's, your menu wouldn't have been out of place in our home. Mum was a fantastic baker and I've scored the gene there... With a few little tweeks courtesy of herbs, spices and newer recipe ideas, I likewise cook similarly to this. Please please please publish your Lemon Delicious recipe (haven't ever been able to get it to work) and your butterscotch pudding recipe!!!!!!

    many thanks for offering this window into the life of your home and family.

    Sarah,
    Sydney.

    ReplyDelete

Thanks so much for taking the time to chat. I don't always have time to reply but I do read every message you leave.